The Army Times reports here that COL Mike Mulligan, who was the lead prosecutor in the capital fragging case of United States v. Akbar, has been detailed as the trial counsel for MAJ Hasan’s case.

h/t Court-Martial Trial Practice

11 Responses to “TC from Akbar case reportedly tapped to prosecute MAJ Hasan”

  1. anon says:

    He was also the lead prosecutor in the Chaplain Yee case from GTMO.

  2. Bill C says:

    And the prosecution of MG Hale. Mike has long been the Army’s top prosecutor and a heck of a lawyer.

  3. Anonymous says:

    The darkside of that argument, might be that the lack, up until very recently, of a crim law track in the army might be the reason why one attorney, undoubtedly a great prosecutor, is doing all of these high profile cases?

  4. Ama Goste says:

    Totally agree, Anon 0820 hrs. On a lighter note, Mulligan and Galligan–what are the odds the military judge will call the attorneys the wrong name at least once?

  5. Cossio says:

    This really isn’t uncommon, as I said earlier the Air Force does this too (LtCl Spath), they bring in specialist for just about everything. Not just high profile cases, and not just for TC either. I’ve seen assistant DC tapped for tough drug cases where the threshold was borderline.

    Anon 0820, well maybe true what else where you expecting the Army to do? Throw a rookie in there? The fact that the Army is throwing in their best dog into the match shouldn’t be a suprise.

    On the otherside, will the Army throw in an experienced DC to go with Hasan’s IDC?

  6. Anonymous says:

    “Anon 0820, well maybe true what else where you expecting the Army to do? Throw a rookie in there? The fact that the Army is throwing in their best dog into the match shouldn’t be a suprise.”

    How in the world does that have anything to do with my response?

  7. Jason Grover says:

    I am curious, Army lurkers, how is the new military justice track working in the Army? Does it seem to influence assignment decisions or promotions? Any feed-back?

  8. Anonymous says:

    too soon to tell. They say it isn’t a “track” per se, and half of us are concerned if you get too much experience the skill identifier is a quick way to move you out of crim law into somewhere else.

    The “everyone wants to be an SJA” or “jack of all skills” mentality is what some of us who simply enjoy crim law and want to do it fear. We’ll know more in a couple of years.

  9. Cossio says:

    I think Super Grover may be thinking of a career change after the SEALs are Aquitted. Just j/k (kind of).

    The grass in the Army is Greener as for as promotions, but for professionalism you should Cross into the Blue…OK, so maybe the AF doesn’t have a great track record with Fiscus, Brown, and Murphy, at leat you can say one thing about AF JAGs, they take care of thier own.

    Anon 820, I went back and re-read your post. I missed it when you said “one attorney”, I assumed you meant “why would they put an experianced lawyer?” when you where really saying, “why only one one lawyer has all the experiance?”.

    I see your point, I stand corrected.

  10. Flea Baylee says:

    I know of a handful of Army folks who have kept on moving up with strictly crim law experience. One was trial counsel, appellate counsel, senior defense counsel, counsel at the Commissions, LLM program, taught at the Point, and now a judge. Nice career.

  11. Some Army Guy says:

    I see a lot more junior field grade officers with lots of crim law experience, and a desire to stay in that field, pushed into other fields “for their own good.”