As discussed in local media, II Marine Expeditionary Force and Marine Corps Installations East recently prohibited attached Active Duty and Reserve personnel from travelling on Catfish Lake Road, an improved unpaved public road that runs through the center of the Croatan National Forest in eastern North Carolina.

The order states: “Commanders will ensure their Marines and Sailors understand they are prohibited from traveling on Catfish Lake Road between NC Highway 58 in Jones County and NC Highway 70 in Craven County while on duty or in a leave or liberty status.”

However, it also states: “Catfish Lake Road may only be traveled when a Marine or Sailor has a legitimate reason for being on the unpaved portions of the road, e.g., hunting, fishing or engaging inother lawful recreational activities.”

Major Fahy, public affairs officer for Camp Lejeune, was quoted as saying “we do know that it is a popular cut-through for Marines going to and from Cherry Point and Camp Lejeune. They have no business using it as a cut through for commuting purposes.”

12 Responses to “Marines make road through National Forest off-limits”

  1. Anonymous says:

    Just curious, how is this related to military justice?

  2. Some Army Guy says:

    Just curious, how is this order related to GO&D?

  3. Some Army Guy says:

    Ah — I read the article now. It’s an unsafe road.

  4. Anonymous says:

    CAAFlog readers might be equally interested to learn that I had spaghetti for dinner.

  5. Late Bloomer says:

    Hmmm…could this be a nod to Serianne?

    Does it make a difference if the road is paid for with tax dollars? What if the road was an interstate highway?

    I wonder what the percentage of accidents resulting in death or serious bodily injury occur on that particular road compared with other state highways or interstates.

  6. Sounds Good says:

    Was it tasty?

  7. John Harwood says:

    This doesn’t seem much different than the G.O. prohibiting airmen to pass other vehicles on the road between Spangdahlem and Bitburg. There were lots of accidents, so the CC made passing unlawful, even though its off base, and the traffic rules of the area allow it.

  8. Late Bloomer says:

    This doesn’t seem much different than the G.O. prohibiting airmen to pass other vehicles on the road between Spangdahlem and Bitburg. There were lots of accidents, so the CC made passing unlawful, even though its off base, and the traffic rules of the area allow it.

    Was that order ever challenged? If so, what outcome?

    This is a bit too paternalistic for my liking. Pretty soon, we’ll outlaw vehicles with anything larger than a 4-banger – it’s for force preservation you know. Better yet, don’t let them drive at all. And while we’re at it, you have to have command authorization to get married…

  9. Ama Goste says:

    It’s already in place, Late Bloomer. Some commands overseas do require command permission for junior enlisted to marry local nationals.

  10. Late Bloomer says:

    It’s already in place, Late Bloomer. Some commands overseas do require command permission for junior enlisted to marry local nationals.

    Overseas is a different issue. I’m talking about the “good ol’ days” when a first-tour private had to get permission to get married.

  11. Phil Cave says:

    Is that a ban on marriage. Seems to me that was ruled unconstitutional in the 1980’s. What wasn’t ruled unconstitutional is a requirement that the member go through counseling prior to getting married, which is different than forbidding the marriage.

  12. JimmyMac says:

    Actually….overseas, the military requires servicemembers obtain “permission” to marry as a prerequisite to obtaining “command sponsorship” for the new spouse/dependent.