The WaPo reports, here, that Raymond Davis, the former Special Forces soldier and current CIA contractor “who fatally shot two Pakistani men in January was released Wednesday after relatives of the victims received ‘blood money’ as compensation and agreed to pardon him, U.S. officials said.”  The WaPo adds:

Davis was released from a Pakistani jail in Lahore after nearly two months in detention and was flown to meet with U.S. officials in Kabul. Cameron Munter, the U.S. ambassador to Pakistan, accompanied Davis on the flight, a U.S. official said

I missed Dana Milbank’s article on Monday, here, that has some good observations about what PFC Bradley Manning has become to both those on the left and right and what he is not.

In other news, apparently PFC Manning is not the only US service member currently facing espionage charges.  The Virginian-Pilot reports that a Navy Reservist Petty Officer is being sent to trial on attempted espionage charges. The Intelligence Specialist reportedly sold SECRET and TOP SECRET documents to an undercover FBI agent for $3,500.

9 Responses to “CIA Contractor Released and Manning News”

  1. Rob M says:

    I think it’s odd that the term “sleeping garment” requires the descriptive qualifier “nonlethal.” I’m pretty sure that’s the default setting on all my sleeping garments.

  2. Christopher Mathews says:

    Raymond Davis … “was released Wednesday after relatives of the victims received ‘blood money’ as compensation and agreed to pardon him, U.S. officials said.”

    So he avoided trial because of Sharia law?

  3. Christopher Mathews says:

    I think it’s odd that the term “sleeping garment” requires the descriptive qualifier “nonlethal.” I’m pretty sure that’s the default setting on all my sleeping garments.

    It’s pretty much the default setting on all of my clothing, although I am wearing a really killer power tie just now.

  4. Michael Keyes says:

    I’m sure that you all know that by “non-lethal” they mean that one can’t strangle or otherwise kill themselves using the clothing. I don’t know what these are, but I suspect paper.

    If a person really wants to die, they can always drown themselves in the toilet. For some reason no one ever thinks of that, however.

  5. soonergrunt says:

    @Michael Keyes,

    The pictures I’ve seen of them are heavily quilted material.
    http://www.preventsuicide.com/
    There was a guy who killed himself at the Miramar brig by shoving toilet paper down his own throat and suffocating himself a couple of years ago. I’d rather not consider the implications of that one for prisoners on POI/Suicide Watch “What do you mean, I can’t wipe?”

  6. Phil Cave says:

    SG that was a Marine captain at Quantico. That’s one of the reasons I believe they are being ultra careful in this case.

  7. soonergrunt says:

    @Phil,

    I knew about the USMC Captain that killed himself. I didn’t know how. I was aware, from a link provided by a friend, of a Sailor in PTC at Miramar who killed himself, and the story said he did it by swallowing toilet paper. I can’t find the link now, though.

  8. soonergrunt says:

    Ahh, here it is:

    http://www.examiner.com/headlines-in-san-diego/sailor-charged-with-murder-found-dead-of-apparent-suicide

    http://exm.nr/gaacX6
    The Sailor was on suicide watch when he killed himself. I guess they weren’t watching closely enough.

  9. Tukey says:

    It does seem like suicide watch could easily create a negative feedback loop – if the conditions are onerous and unpleasant enough someone who was other wise unlikely to seriously consider suicide might find themselves looking at it as an acceptable alternative to isolation, 24hrs a day of lights on, humiliation etc… etc…