From Navy Times, here:

Three Nobel Peace Prize winners say a U.S. Army private being court-martialed for allegedly sending classified information to the secret-busting website Wiki[shhhh] deserves gratitude, not persecution.

The letter signed by Desmond Tutu, Mairead Maguire and Adolfo Perez Esquivel appears in the Dec. 3 issue of The Nation magazine.

They say Pfc. Bradley Manning is a courageous whistleblower whose alleged actions revealed covert crimes in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Much like LCDR Diaz’s prize, here, he’s got that going for him.

13 Responses to “Nobel Peace Prize Winners Weigh in for PFC Manning”

  1. Gene Fidell says:

    Ridiculous!

  2. Bridget Wilson says:

    This is the reason the military courts should be as open as possible with information, to help inform the public about the reality of a case like this. Whether convicted or not, PFC Manning is not a hero.
     

  3. Babu says:

    Very persuasive….although I can’t completely sign off on Manning as a hero (and dropping all charges) until I have also received the input of actors and singers.    

  4. Bill C says:

    It ain’t over till Barbra sings.

  5. michael korte says:

    Speaking for the younger generation, I’m waiting for Sheryl Crow to chime in, as she is my go-to for foreign policy / military advice.  “I think war is never the answer to solving any problems.  The best way to solve problems is to not have enemies.”

  6. Gene Fidell says:

    Thinking further about this, I wonder how Archbishop Tutu and the other Nobel Peace Prize-winning signatories would feel if someone hacked their email accounts and posted the entire contents on the web. Or if, instead of a hacker, the responsible person was their confidential assistant.

  7. Phil Cave says:

    Or the government.

  8. Gene Fidell says:

    Phil, aren’t you conflating scandals?

  9. Teufelmutt says:

    But none of these laureates has convening authority. Alas, PFC Manning is one notable Laureate short of making this a successful campaign.

  10. John Harwood says:

    One might reasonably argue that PFC Manning has been made to suffer degrading treatment during his time in PTC.  One might also reasonably argue that he has been overcharged — that an Aiding the Enemy charge isn’t warranted.  I do not believe, however, that one may reasonably argue that PFC Manning acted courageously and is deserving of the thanks of a grateful nation.  No effing way. 

  11. Soonergrunt says:

    @John Harwood, 2343 18NOV2012:

    One might reasonably argue that PFC Manning has been made to suffer degrading treatment during his time in PTC.  One might also reasonably argue that he has been overcharged — that an Aiding the Enemy charge isn’t warranted.  I do not believe, however, that one may reasonably argue that PFC Manning acted courageously and is deserving of the thanks of a grateful nation.  No effing way.

    I just went ahead and quoted that in entirety because it says exactly what I think, but so much more eloquently.

  12. WWJD says:

    I stopped caring about the Nobel Prize when Al Gore got one for Hype and our Dear Leader for nothingness.

  13. stewie says:

    My thoughts:

    1. Calling the President Dear Leader is something I don’t understand, no matter how much you disagree with his politics, that kind of hyperbole isn’t helpful.

    2. I agree, PFC Manning is not a hero. Now, IF he had tried to go through normal channels, and IF he limited his reveal to ONLY evidence of a crime MAYBE we could discuss that possibility, but the willy nilly release of whatever he could get his hands on belies that being a viable notion.

    3. I do think he’s been over-charged and over made a big deal of, and he should have simply been charged with the obvious things, tried already, and sitting in jail, post-trial awaiting his appellate process IMO. He’s not a criminal mastermind, just a stupid, immature kid.

    4. I think the folks who signed this obviously don’t know the full details, they just know part of the stuff he got his hands on was us doing bad things.