Not sure if all you busy folks have been following events in Taiwan and their military justice system.

UPI today has this summary of events:

Taiwanese government has amended a military justice law, stripping the military of the right to prosecute its own personnel during peacetime.  As a result of the change, 254 military prisoners were transferred Thursday from Tainan Military Prison — the military’s only prison — to civilian prisons.

http://focustaiwan.tw/search/201308130029.aspx?q=court-martial

http://focustaiwan.tw/news/aipl/201308140034.aspx

http://focustaiwan.tw/news/aipl/201308150027.aspx

A copy of the law (in translation) is CBDR, it will be interesting to see if it is complete loss of jurisdiction or retains jurisdiction for purely military offenses.

3 Responses to “Not far enough?”

  1. rob klant says:

    I can’t help but wonder if there isn’t some global influence driving this, notwithstanding specific national events or conditions.   http://www.law.yale.edu/2011-04_International_trends.pdf
    An emerging consensus of what constitutes “justice” which is antithetical to the values of any classical military justice system?

  2. dude says:

    rob klant, 
    Thank you for sharing that article.  Very interesting.

  3. Cap'n Crunch says:

    I thought the most interesting portions were the following:  “The inmates to be transferred Thursday include three two-star generals, two one-star generals and Navy Cap. Kuo Li-heng, who was put behind bars for his role in brokering kickbacks in a high-profile Lafayette frigate deal in the 1990s, the official said.”
    What was even more surprising was that this, like the sexual assault scandals in the U.S. military… was borne as a consequence of an incident — in this, apparently, the suspicious death of a corporal in military confinement, for what was apparently a very minor offense (he had a camera phone), and the imposition of what appears to be a hazing type environment (physical activities without water, etc).